Statistical Reasoning in Biology Concept Inventory (SRBCI)

Rationale

Designed to complement the First Year Undergraduate Experimental Design Inventory, this inventory was developed because there is a great need for students to be able to critically analyze data accurately in order to make informed decisions and come to reliable conclusions. Again, this skill transfers beyond Biology, and Science, because the ability to assess the validity of any research-based claim will provide the opportunity to make better life choices.

Development Timeframe

This concept inventory has been through two comprehensive rounds of undergraduate student validation, a focus group/feedback session, and a primary review by experts (instructors). It has undergone expert validation and is being used as a pre- and post-test in the fall of 2013 in two science classes at UBC and in science classes at other institutions in North America. This inventory is ready for use by interested parties.

Number Of Questions

This inventory features 12 multiple choice questions, including concepts ranging from statistical significance, basic graph/trend interpretation, and the differences and similarities between accepting or rejecting hypotheses and predictions based on results.

Contributors

Thomas Deane and Kathy Nomme worked together to complete this inventory. To read biographic information and/or to contact either contributor, click on their names or see the ‘People‘ page. Once you have contacted them this way, Thomas and/or Kathy can provide you with a password to download the SRBCI package.

Download the SRBCI Package

After you have been cleared for access, you can download the files that make up the complete Statistical Reasoning in Biology Concept Inventory Package by inputting the password you were given here.

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