Meiosis

Rationale

Understanding what happens to chromosomes during the process of meiosis is necessary to grasp many fundamental concepts in eukaryotic genetics. However, a large proportion of students at all levels hold misconceptions related to meiosis, which in turn affects their understanding of genetics. The meiosis concept inventory was developed to assist instructors in detecting such misconceptions (in the hope that appropriate remedial action could be taken), and also as a tool to measure the effects of specific learning activities.

Development Timeframe

This inventory has been fully validated, tested in large classes and used to assess the effectiveness of a structured learning activity (a manuscript is currently in preparation). Recently, we have developed two additional questions that are undergoing final student validation.

Number of Questions

The fully validated inventory consists of 17 questions, testing 5-6 independent concepts.

Contributors

Pam Kalas and Jennifer Klenz developed the inventory questions, and over 80 UBC undergraduate students and many faculty members participated in the process. Carol Pollock was also pivotal in the development of this inventory. To read biographical information about Pam and/or Carol, or to contact either of these team members, please click on their names or see the ‘People’ page. Once you have contacted them this way, Pam and/or Carol can provide you with a password to download the Meiosis Concept Inventory package.

Publication

The Meiosis Concept Inventory has now been published in CBE – Life Sciences Education (Winter 2013).

Read the paper here.

Download the Meiosis Concept Inventory Package

After you have been cleared for access, you can download the files that make up the complete Meiosis Concept Inventory Package by inputting the password you were given here.

 

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